Thursday

 

Leggings protest breaks out after Notre Dame mom’s puritanical plea
WaPost

leggings
Leggings rebel Dani Green

While attending Mass at the University of Notre Dame last fall, Maryann White saw something that horrified her: leggings. A group of young women, all clad in clingy Spandex and short tops, were sitting directly in front of her and her family.

“I thought of all the other men around and behind us who couldn’t help but see their behinds,” the self-described Catholic mother of four sons wrote in a letter to the editor that was published by the Observer, Notre Dame’s student newspaper, on Monday. “My sons know better than to ogle a woman’s body — certainly when I’m around (and hopefully, also when I’m not). They didn’t stare, and they didn’t comment afterwards. But you couldn’t help but see those blackly naked rear ends. I didn’t want to see them — but they were unavoidable. How much more difficult for young guys to ignore them.”

By way of responding to her complaints, more than 1,000 students at the private Catholic University in South Bend, Ind., indicated that they planned to wear leggings to class this week.  “The Legging Protest,” was organized by Kaitlyn Wong, a senior who wrote, in parody of White’s letter, “I’m just a Catholic woman who feels the need for one specific type of pant that provides utmost comfort: leggings.” She asked people of all genders to express their solidarity by wearing their favorite pair of leggings that day. Again, more than 1,000 people expressed interest.

“Unfortunately,” one participant wrote, “I could not find Maryann on [Facebook] to invite her and her four sons to ogle us on Wednesday.”

After stunning act of forgiveness, victim of prank dies
Newsday

ruvoloVictoria Ruvolo, who in a stunning act of kindness publicly forgave a teenager after he tossed a 20-pound turkey through her windshield in 2004, shattering every bone in the Lake Ronkonkoma woman’s face, died Monday. She was 59.

Her nephew, Anthony Ruvolo, confirmed his aunt’s death Wednesday and said the cause was unknown. Ruvolo’s death was also announced on her website and professional Facebook page.

“It is with a very heavy heart that we announce the sudden and unexpected passing of our beloved Vickie,” stated the message on her website, victoriaruvolo.com. “Forgive someone today.”

Ruvolo’s case captured the imagination of people around the world, first, because of its shocking nature, and later for her mercy on display when she begged prosecutors to spare Ryan Cushing, the teenager who tossed the turkey, from a potential 25-year prison sentence.

Ruvolo hugged Cushing in court during his second-degree assault guilty plea in 2005 and said, “Just do something good with your life.”

“I’d ask myself, ‘What good is it going to do to throw him in jail for 25 years?’ ” she said in a 2011 Newsday interview. “Then I realized why it had happened to me. It happened to me so that I could save someone else’s life — Ryan’s.”

She turned her tragedy into a career of compassion. Through motivational speaking and her book, “No Room for Vengeance: In Justice and Healing,” Ruvolo urged victims to forgive their assailants.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN AN AIR TRAVEL BRAND BECOMES SYNONYMOUS WITH DISASTER
Pacific Standard

After two crashes, Malaysian Airlines needed government support and still barely survives …

… the connection between Concorde and its single catastrophe never went away: As passenger numbers plummeted, the two airlines that flew Concorde, Air France and British Airways, gave up supersonic flight. The last Concorde was grounded in 2003.

Today, to avoid the same fate as the Concorde, Boeing will need to find a way to prevent its name from becoming synonymous with calamity in the minds of potential passengers. (The battle may prove even more difficult for the aerospace company than Malaysia Airlines or Concorde: Though investigations are ongoing, it seems possible that Boeing might bear some fault in the crashes.)

This woman’s genetic mutation shields her from pain and anxiety
Popular Science

On top of not needing any pain medication for severe arthritis in her hand, nor for the surgery, she has a fairly long history of health problems with no associated pain. Just a year before this operation, she required a hip replacement due to the severe degradation of that joint. The two days after that operation she took a couple grams of paracetamol (though only because she was encouraged to take it) and didn’t require any further pain meds.

With some further questioning, she also told the researchers that she often smelled her flesh searing before she realized she was getting burned, and that she could eat Scotch bonnet chili peppers with zero discomfort—they just give her a “pleasant glow” in the mouth. She’d needed stitches for a severe laceration, fractured her left wrist, and gotten dental procedures all without feeling any pain. She also doesn’t seem to experience much anxiety or fear. During a recent car accident, she reported not panicking at all.

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 30-Year High
NPR

“Looking at the various metrics available, the ones that pop out to me are distraction related to smartphone use and the market share increase in SUVs.”

Since 2013, the number of consumers buying light trucks has far outpaced those buying cars. “There’s no question that pedestrians hit by SUVs are more likely to die than those hit by a car,” he said. SUVs are bigger, heavier and deadlier for pedestrians.

Compounding that problem are smartphones. Both walkers and drivers use cell data 4,000 percent more than they did in 2008, which means they aren’t watching the roads. Retting said he would like to see autonomous pedestrian sensor technology added to more vehicles. The technology does exist but isn’t widespread, and it won’t be in most cars anytime soon since most vehicles on the road today are at least 10 years old.

14 COPS INDICTED IN BEATING, CONSPIRACY

SPRINGFIELD, MA — Fourteen Springfield police officers were charged Wednesday in connection with the beating of four people outside a city bar and subsequent coverup, prosecutors said. The assault happened outside Nathan Bill’s Bar & Restaurant on April 8, 2015, according to state Attorney General Maura Healey. After an argument at the bar, six of the officers and the bar’s owner assaulted the four victims outside the establishment, Healey said. Some of the victims were left with “permanent” injuries, Healey said in a statement. After the attack, a group of officers engaged in a “long-standing” coverup, Healey claimed. One of the officers charged in the coverup is a former Springfield police officer.

Klobachar trots out $1 trillion plan for infrastructure
Politico

—-> So far the scrum for the nomination has been mostly personal attacks. Here is an actual policy proposal. 

In addition to improving roads and bridges, Klobuchar pledged to modernize airports, seaports and modern waterways, noting that “allowing these assets to fall into disrepair hurts our economy.” The campaign also pledged work to update and expand public transportation, particularly in low-income, majority-minority communities, while also committing to reliable access to safe and clean water.

To pay for it, Klobuchar floated raising the corporate tax rate from 21 percent to 25 percent, rolling back one of the central pieces of the Republican Party’s tax law passed in December 2017.

‘Bye, Jayme,’ man who kidnapped girl and murdered her parents says as he leaves court
WaPost

“Bye Jayme?” This sicko broke into her home, and blew her father away with a shotgun. When Jayme and her mom retreated screaming into the bathroom, he shot her mom to death even as the two clung together. And now he says: “Bye, Jayme?”

How the move to legalize pot in NJ fell apart
NY Times

Some lawmakers were unsure about how to tax marijuana sales. Others feared legalization would flood the state’s congested streets and highways with impaired drivers. Some would not be deterred from believing that marijuana was a dangerous menace to public health.

A disagreement existed among lawmakers about how far to go regarding the social justice component in the legalization bill: Fissures grew over whether it was necessary to expunge criminal records for marijuana-related offenses for those found with as much as five pounds of the drug.

… some of the loudest opposition came from powerful African-American lawmakers. Ronald L. Rice, a Democratic senator from Newark, argued that legalization would lead to “marijuana bodegas,” which would further push the drug into poor urban communities.

(NYT makes no mention of corporate lobbying pressure … surely there was some…)

In most of America, average worker can’t afford a home
CBS News

Even with rising wages and falling mortgage rates, Americans can’t afford a home in more than 70 percent of the country. Out of 473 U.S. counties analyzed in a report, 335 listed median home prices more than what average wage earners could afford, according to a report from ATTOM Data Solutions. Among them are the counties that include Los Angeles and San Diego in California, as well as Miami-Dade County in Florida and Maricopa County in Arizona.

Chicago is getting a terrifying new architectural thrill ride
Fast Company

Aon_Center_(Chicago),_north_faceWithin the next three years, tourists in Chicago will have the chance to go on one crazy ride: A glass platform will launch thrill seekers 82 stories into the air, at speeds of 16.6 feet per second. This isn’t an amusement park attraction, though. It’s a glass elevator that will be installed on the exterior of one of the city’s many notable towers, the Aon Center.

Facebook charged with racial discrimination in targeted housing ads
Reuters

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development charged Facebook on Thursday with violating the Fair Housing Act, alleging that the company’s targeted advertising discriminated on the basis of race and color.

HUD said Facebook also restricted who could see housing- related ads based on national origin, religion, familial status, sex and disability.

The social media giant said last week it would create a new advertising portal for ads linked to housing and employment that would limit targeting options for advertisers


USA Today’s warped idea of a news story:

Their headline: ‘Big Bang Theory’ star Johnny Galecki trolls ‘Jeopardy!’ contestant who botched his name

— So now it’s news when a celebrity’s publicity agent makes a desperate bid for attention because … his client’s name wasn’t pronounced correctly on a game show?


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